Mentorship registry

Find a mentor

The CCN-RCC Mentorship Program represents a multidisciplinary pool of expertise, to provide career mentorship to trainees and assist in developing successful professional careers, in academia and beyond. Mentorship will be accomplished through a series of meetings, scheduled between mentor and mentee approximately 2-4 times per year to discuss a variety of topics (e.g., time management, leadership, networking, career progression).

The registry below lists CCN-RCC members who have volunteered to become mentors for concussion trainees across Canada. Trainees interested in a specific mentor are encouraged to send an introductory email, using the « contact » button in the mentor’s profile, with a brief bio and reasons for wanting a mentor .

Note: The capacity for each mentor is limited and mentors reserve the right to set the number of mentees they accept.

Dr. Miriam Beauchamp

Title(s):

Canada Research Chair in Pediatric TBI
Full Professor, Depaertment of Psychology, Université de Montréal
Neuropsychologist & Director of the Brain and Research Axis, CHU Sainte-Justine Research Centre

Biography:

Miriam Beauchamp is Full Professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Montreal and at the Sainte-Justine Hospital Research Center (www.abcs.umontreal.ca). She holds the Canada Research Chair in Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury. In 2017, she was recognized as Quebec’s most promising early career researcher (Prix du Québec-Relève scientifique). She was awarded early career awards from the International Neuropsychological Society (2015) and the International Brain Injury Association (2019), and was inducted to the College of New Scholars of the Royal Society of Canada (2019). Her clinical research program seeks to improve our understanding of concussion across the pediatric age span, but she has a particular focus in the diagnosis, outcome, remediation and prevention of concussion sustained during early childhood (0-5 years). In parallel, her work at the crossroads of social neuroscience and neuropsychology informs the development of novel digital health tools. Her work has been featured in >190 publications.

Dr. Maryam Butt

Early career investigator

Title(s):

Postdoctoral Associate, Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary

Biography:

I am a highly accomplished electrical engineer with over a decade of clinical-based research and undergraduate teaching experience. I earned my Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from the University of Wollongong, Australia, and has since passionate about using data to generate insights and solve problems in diverse domains. My research portfolio spans bio-signal processing, stroke rehabilitation, and sport science. Currently, as a Postdoctoral Associate at the University of Calgary, I employ statistical techniques and machine learning algorithms on data from ten+ clinical tests performed on high-performance athletes. My project’s goal is to reduce the risk and severity of concussion and lower-body injury while optimizing athletes’ performance. In addition to my research, I am a dedicated educator and taught a diverse population of undergraduate students in Pakistan, Australia, and Canada for the past 10 years.

Dr. Molly Cairncross

Early career investigator

Title(s):

Professor, Department of Psychology, Simon Fraser University

Biography:

I am an assistant professor in the department of psychology at Simon Fraser University and an Investigator at British Columbia Children’s Hospital Research Institute. My team studies the psychosocial determinants of health after concussion across the lifespan and uses these insights to develop accessible behavioural interventions. Our work utilizes mixed-methods, longitudinal, and patient-oriented research designs. Prior to my appointment at SFU, I completed a postdoctoral research fellowship at the University of British Columbia (2019-2021) and MA/PhD training in clinical psychology (neuropsychology) at the University of Windsor (2013-2019). My own mentors have hugely shaped my career trajectory. I hope to give back to other trainees within the CCN in the same way.

Dr. Chantel Debert

Title(s):

Associate Professor, Cumming School of Medicine, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, University of Calgary

Biography:

Dr. Debert is a clinician scientist in the department of clinical neuroscience. Physiatrist-trained clinically she see patients with concussion and moderate/severe brain injury. From a research perspective she focuses on understanding the pathophysiology of brain injury using a variety of tools such as blood, imaging and electrophysiological biomarkers. Further research interests explores novel treatment approaches for symptoms following concussion and traumatic brain injury. She is the lead of the Calgary Brain injury program, member of the Ontario Neurotrauma concussion guidelines task force, research lead for the Canadian association of physical medicine and rehabilitation.

Dr. Carolyn Emery

Title(s):

Professor, Chair Sport Injury Prevention Research Centre, Co-Chair Integrated Concussion Research Program, Faculty of Kinesiology and Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary

Biography:

Carolyn Emery PT PhD is a physiotherapist and injury epidemiologist. A Professor in the Faculty of Kinesiology and Pediatrics and Community Health Sciences, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary (UCalgary); she holds a Canada Research Chair (Tier 1) in Concussion and is a Fellow of the Canadian Academy of Health Sciences and Royal Society of Canada. Carolyn Chairs the Sport Injury Prevention Research Centre (Canadian International Olympic Committee Research Centre for Prevention of Injury and Protection of Athlete Health) and co-Chairs the Integrated Concussion Research Program at UCalgary. She is a member of the Alberta Children’s Hospital Research Institute, O’Brien Institute for Public Health, and Hotchkiss Brain Institute. The focus of Carolyn’s research program is concussion prevention in youth sport, with a focus also on rehabilitation and youth adapted physical activity and parasport; aimed to reduce the public health burden of concussions and their consequences. Carolyn aims to keep kids participating in the sports they love.

Dr. Alon Friedman

Title(s):

Professor, Department of Medical Neuroscience, Faculty of Medicine, Dalhousie University

Biography:

Dr. Alon Friedman is a Professor of Neuroscience and Dennis Chair in Epilepsy Research at Dalhousie University, Halifax, and a Professor in the Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Israel. He earned his MD and PhD at Ben-Gurion University, did his neurosurgery residency at Soroka University Medical Center, and pursued post-doctoral training at Charité Medical University, Berlin, as an Alexander von Humboldt fellow. Dr. Friedman’s research focuses on the interactions between vascular and neuronal systems, particularly microvascular pathology and blood-brain barrier dysfunction in brain injuries, epilepsy, and neurodegeneration. With over 175 peer-reviewed publications and supervision of more than 60 post-graduate students, his work has significantly advanced the understanding and treatment of brain injuries. His multidisciplinary teams are pioneering new diagnostic and therapeutic methodologies for brain injury management.

Dr. Isabelle Gagnon

Title(s):

Professor, School of Physical and Occupational Therapy

Biography:

I am a Professor in the Physical Therapy at McGill University, as well as a pediatric physiotherapist and clinician-scientist at the Montreal Children’s Hospital (MUHC). My research program continues to be inspired and anchored in the daily clinical reality of children and adolescents who sustain mild traumatic brain injuries, as well as other traumatic injuries, and receive services from pediatric tertiary care hospitals and trauma centers. As has been the focus since the inception of my research program, the overarching aim of my work remains to better understand the consequences of mild traumatic brain injuries sustained by children and adolescents as they relate to the practice of physical activities, and to optimize recovery post-injury, by way of specific interventions, in order to facilitate and contribute to a safer and more satisfying return to physical activities. I enroll children and adolescents from the Pediatric Emergency Department and from the Concussion Clinic.

Dr. Laura Graham

Title(s):

Assistant Professor, School of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Health Sciences
Associate Scientist, Research to Practices (R2P) team, Lawson Health Research Institute
Physiotherapist, NeuroTrauma Rehabilitation, Parkwood Institute, St. Joseph’s Health Care London

Biography:

Dr. Graham’s teaching focus is neurological injury/illness rehabilitation and her research interests focus on intervention development for adults with persistent symptoms following concussion or mild traumatic brain injuries (mTBI). Dr. Graham has worked as a physiotherapist at Parkwood Institute since 2011, primarily in adult brain injury rehabilitation. She has consulted with Ontario Brain Institute and WSIB Ontario on mTBI Program of Care revision, presented education of the treatment of mTBI both locally and internationally, and has taught physiotherapist instructors across Canada about concussion rehabilitation for the National Orthopaedic Division of the Canadian Physiotherapy Association. Dr. Graham is currently helping to develop and evaluate two interventions for adults with mTBI. The first is BrainEx90: a circuit training-style intervention covering self-management exercises, vision rehabilitation, vestibular rehabilitation, balance and core stability, cardiovascular training, and cognitive rehabilitation. The second is MyBrainPacer™ App, which is a symptom self-management tool to support people with mTBI with planning and pacing activities.

Dr. Scott Ramsay

Early career investigator

Title(s):

Assistant Professor, School of Nursing, University of British Columbia
Nurse Clinician, Neurological Care Centre, BC Children’s Hospital

Biography:

Dr. Scott Ramsay is an Assistant Professor in the School of Nursing at the University of British Columbia and Nurse Clinician in the Neurological Care Centre at BC Children’s Hospital. Dr. Ramsay focuses on the health care services for children and youth with a neurological condition, and the study of factors impeding care. He is interested in the integration of multidisciplinary care in the delivery of care for individuals with a traumatic brain injury. He is dedicated to connecting clinical care, research, and policy through collaborating with patients, clinicians, policymakers, and researchers, given his multiple roles in the care of children and youth in British Columbia.

Dr. Nick Reed

Title(s):

Associate Professor, Department of Occupational Science & Occupational Therapy, University of Toronto

Biography:

Nick Reed completed his Bachelor of Kinesiology at McMaster University, his Masters of Science in Occupational Therapy within the Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy at the University of Toronto, and his PhD within the Graduate Department of Rehabilitation Science at the University of Toronto. Nick is an Associate Professor in the Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy at the University of Toronto where he directs the OAK (Outcomes, Advocacy and Knowledge) Concussion Lab and holds a Canada Research Chair (Tier 2) in Pediatric Concussion. Additionally, Nick is a member of the Rehabilitation Sciences Institute at the University of Toronto.His work focuses on developing, delivering and evaluating research, educational and clinical programming specific to youth and concussion. His passion is helping youth do the things they need, want and love to do in their lives.

Dr. Kelly Russell

Title(s):

Associate Professor, Department of Pediatrics and Child Health, University of Manitoba
Adjunct Professor, Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Manitoba
Research Scientist, Children’s Hospital Research Institute of Manitoba

Biography:

My concussion research focuses on risk factors for prolonged recovery from a pediatric concussion, psychosocial and academic outcomes following a pediatric concussion, and health-related quality of life during concussion recovery in youth. The majority of my work is focused on sport-related concussion. I am also interested in traumatic brain injuries occurring in the context of intimate partner violence and particularly how to prevent such injuries and violent behavior. My research often employees cohort and case-control study designs using either prospectively or retrospectively collected data or provincial administrative data. I am also well versed in conducting systematic reviews.

Dr. Jonathan Smirl

Early career investigator

Title(s):

Assistant Professor, Kinesiology

Biography:

Jonathan Smirl is an Associate Professor at the Sport Injury Prevention Research Centre, Faculty of Kinesiology at the University of Calgary specializing in the area of sport-related concussions. He is a cerebrovascular and exercise physiologist, and was the first Canadian ever elected to the International Cerebral Autoregulation Research Network (CARNet) steering committee. His research focuses on understanding the cerebrovascular, blood biomarkers and autonomic dysregulation which occurs following a concussion and aims to use this knowledge to develop informed exercise interventions which can be used to help aid in the recovery process during both acute and prolonged symptom periods.

Dr. Elizabeth Teel

Early career investigator

Title(s):

Assistant Professor, Department of Health, Kinesiology, and Applied Physiology, Concordia University

Biography:

Dr. Teel is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Health, Kinesiology, and Applied Physiology at Concordia University. She received her PhD in Human Movement Science from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2017 and completed two postdoctoral fellowships at McGill University (2017-2022), focusing on pediatric concussion and advanced electroencephalography analysis respectively. Dr. Teel’s research integrates kinesiology and neuroscience approaches to improve clinical diagnosis, prognosis, and management for children with concussion. More specifically, she uses advanced neuroimaging and functional brain monitoring approaches to characterize post-concussion changes in brain structure and function and evaluates the effect of treatment programs (such as aerobic exercise) on clinical and neurophysiological recovery.

Dr. Keith Yeates

Title(s):

Professor, Department of Psychology, University of Calgary

Biography:

Keith Owen Yeates, PhD, ABPP, FCAHS, FRSC, is the Ronald and Irene Ward Chair in Pediatric Brain Injury and Professor of Psychology at the University of Calgary, in Alberta. He has a 30-year track record of funded research focusing on the outcomes of childhood brain disorders, especially traumatic brain injury and concussion, and has been involved in multiple expert panels guiding diagnosis and management of mild traumatic brain injury. Dr. Yeates is inaugural Chair of the Canadian Concussion Network and Editor-in-Chief of Neuropsychology. He has served as President of the Society of Clinical Neuropsychology and of the International Neuropsychological Society. He is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association, Canadian Academy of Health Sciences, and the Royal Society of Canada.

Dr. Roger Zemek

Title(s):

Professor, Department of Pediatrics, University of Ottawa

Biography:

I am a Pediatric Emergency physician, full Professor and Tier-1 Clinical Research Chair in Pediatric Concussion at the University of Ottawa, and Senior Scientist at the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute. I hold national and international leadership positions: Chair of the Pediatric Emergency Research Canada (PERC) network, Executive committee of the Canadian Concussion Network (CCN), lead for Living Guideline for Pediatric Concussion Care, and member of numerous international committees for concussion. My program of research advanced the care of pediatric concussion through the derivation and validation of a clinical prediction score for prolonged recovery (5P study) and provided key evidence for the paradigm shift in the acute post-injury management which now recommends the assimilation of early physical activity to promote recovery.

Dr. Anne Wheeler

Title(s):

Senior Scientist, SickKids

Biography:

Dr. Wheeler’s research program applies advanced neuroimaging methods to characterize brain connectivity and how changes in connectivity driven by traumatic injury, psychopathology, development, and genetics affect behaviour and cognition. https://lab.research.sickkids.ca/wheeler

Become a mentor

We are currently accepting voluntary registrations from CCN-RCC members and early career investigators (i.e., within 5 years of their primary academic appointment) to become mentors for concussion trainees across Canada.

Please download the mentor application form and submit it by email to info@ccn-rcc.ca



Questions?

Questions about the Mentorship Program can be directed to info@ccn-rcc.ca.

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